Tag Archives: boys

13-Year-Old Blind Wrestler Max Lamm

Inspiring teen – 13 year old blind wrestler Max Lamm is wrestling’s amazing student athlete:

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As reported in the Bleacher Report, “Max Lamm is a 13-year-old wrestler from Mars, Pennsylvania with an incredible story. He lost his sight as a result of cancerous tumors that developed in both eyes when he was an infant. Despite being unable to see, Max finished last season with a 10-1 record, dominated his weight class in a regional summer tournament and managed to win his school’s geography bee.”

Click on the video to see his remarkable story.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Takedown on Ethics from High School Wrestling

Ethics and WrestlingIn my son’s first high school wrestling match in an important tournament last weekend, a rather strange thing happened.  Strange for a wrestling match, at least. 

At one point in the match, with the score tied and my son in control of his opponent, my son let the other boy up, pointed to the kid’s face and looked at the ref in question.  The ref signaled the boys to continue wrestling.  While my son was looking at the ref, the other boy scored a takedown and ended up winning the match by one point.

When the match was over and I’d given my son a cooling off period (essential, as any wrestling parent will tell you) I approached my son and asked him what happened.  He said that the boy screamed and then shouted, “My eye!”  So he let the boy up so that the ref could stop the match for an injury timeout.  But in this instance, the ref either didn’t see an injury or didn’t feel that the injury was serious enough to stop the match.  Also, my son’s decision to let the boy up may have cost him an otherwise winnable match in an important competition

Takedown on Ethics via the High School Wrestling Mat

After my son walked off to join his teammates, I started to think of a parent’s ethical obligations in a situation like this.  Should I have encouraged him to ignore the boy’s cries and continue wrestling until the referee stopped them?  Or should I have congratulated him for deciding that the other wrestler’s eyesight is more important than a high school wrestling match?  I should mention that my son is 17 years old, a high school senior and in his final year of competing in wrestling (having decided to forgo competing in college).

As it is, I took the third route.  I simply said, “Good match” and walked back to join our group of parents.

One of the hardest jobs as a parent is to realize that at a certain age, our children have internalized the value system that will guide them through the myriad of ethical choices that they will face as adults.  In this instance, my son didn’t need me to tell him whether his choice was right or wrong.  During a heated competition, he used his own ethical compass and decided to err on the side of avoiding further injury to his opponent .  At the time, he didn’t know that this decision would cost him the match.  And I doubt that he would have acted differently had he known that.

So my advice in this instance is to myself (and maybe any other parents of athletes reading this).  Once your kids reach a certain age, trust them to do the right thing.  Most of the time, you’ll be proud of their decisions. And you’ll feel like you’ve done an OK job as a parent. That’s my advice to myself and I’m sticking with it!

The Downside of Media Portrayal for Young Women – by Eric Linne

Miss Representation comments by Eric Linne YA Author of ReversalThis past week, my wife and I watched the documentary Miss Representation . This 90 minute film shows the downside of the media portrayal of young women and uncovers a glaring reality we live with every day but fail to see. Written and directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, the film exposes how mainstream media contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America.

Miss Representation challenges the media’s limited and often disparaging portrayals of women and girls, which make it difficult for women to achieve leadership positions and for the average woman to feel powerful herself.

In a society where media is the most persuasive force shaping cultural norms, the collective message that our young women and men overwhelmingly receive is that a woman’s value and power lie in her youth, beauty, and sexuality, and not in her capacity as a leader.

While women have made great strides in leadership over the past few decades, the United States is still 90th in the world for women in national legislatures, women hold only 3% of clout positions in mainstream media, and 65% of women and girls have disordered eating behavior.

My takeaway on the media portrayal of young women

My takeaway is that the plethora of unrealistic portrayals of women and girls has an insidious effect not just on the psyches of young girls, but also on boys who are bombarded with the same messages on a daily basis.  While it is not realistic to expect media and entertainment streams to immediately correct the decades long misrepresentations of woman and girls, it is incumbent on parents to help filter what children watch in all medias and to provide context where little or none is provided in the media.

Responsible parents of both boys and girls must take a stand to insure that both genders grow up with healthy and realistic portrayals woman and girls – more than half of the people in our country.